wonder-woman

Against women-only screenings of ‘Wonder Woman’? Its creator would like a word.

If they had cinemas, they'd certainly have women-only screenings. Care to argue with them?Image: warner bros. As the millions of Americans who gave it a record-breaking $100 million weekend now know, Wonder Woman spends most of its opening hour on Themyscira, the fictional island of the Amazons. Or, as it used to be called in the comics, Paradise Island. There’s a reason why William Moulton Marston, Wonder Woman’s creator, gave his heroine the Paradise Island background when he delivered her to the world in 1941. This wasn’t just another Krypton, a way to introduce a superhero with a cool otherworldly origin. SEE ALSO: ‘Wonder Woman’ $100 million box office is the best opening for a female director No, Marston’s reasoning can be summed up by two words that are often mocked in modern political discourse: safe space. His Amazons were women who’d fled slavery in Ancient Greece and found eternal life beyond the terrors of “man’s world.” Their island was an allegory for what real-world women needed Virginia Woolf’s all-important room of one’s own, writ large. Marston, a man ahead of his time in his feminist beliefs, was also a fan of feminist utopias. As Jill Lepore has noted in

How Wonder Woman finally made it to the big screen

Wonder Woman's fought her way through (development) hell and back.Image: Clay Enos / Warner Bros. Next week, Wonder Woman hits theaters with her-ever first live-action solo adventure. And it only took her 76 years to get there. Although she’s only a few years younger than her Justice League teammates Superman and Batman, Wonder Woman has had far worse luck making the leap to movies. But it’s not for lack of trying. SEE ALSO: Final ‘Wonder Woman’ trailer: More action, more weapons, and Dr. Poison To the contrary, Wonder Woman is the payoff to decades of on-again, off-again efforts to bring the Amazonian princess to the big screen. With the film just days away from release, let’s take a look back at the long and winding journey it took to get here. Wonder Woman’s early days Wonder Woman first appears in the comics in 1941. Image: DC Comics Wonder Woman made her comic debut in 1941, just two years after Batman and three years after Superman. Even though she was immediately popular, it took her a while to cross over into other media. 1967: Wonder Woman tries to transition to TV. The first attempted Wonder Woman TV series, Who’s Afraid of