Netflix

Full spoilers ahead: Let’s talk about Marvel’s ‘The Defenders’

To quote Beyonc, "Of course sometimes shit goes down when it's a billion dollars on an elevator." As of this weekend, TV’s answer to The Avengers is officially live: The Defenders hit Netflix with eight episodes, finally fulfilling the promise made by the Marvel deal back in 2013. And the show’s jam-packed with developments we’ve been waiting for. Iron Fist and Luke Cage, together at last! Misty Knight and Colleen Wing, meeting for the very first time! The Hand storyline developed in Daredevil and Iron Fist comes to fruition, and even the literal plot hole of Daredevil Season 2 gets filled up. So why does it all feel so perfunctory? The Defenders is fine. Just fine. It is really cool seeing the whole gang together, though. Image: Netflix To be clear, The Defenders isn’t awful. It’s fine. Just fine! It does what it’s supposed to, which is bring all four heroes together, and those interactions make up the best parts of the show. It’s genuinely thrilling to see Matt introduce himself as Jessica’s lawyer, or Luke and Danny go mano-a-mano in an alleyway. Each main character gets an opportunity to show off their talents and get in some quips. The

The Porn Business Isnt Anything Like You Think It Is

Midway through the second season of Silicon Valley, the HBO series that so skillfully spoofs the Bay Area tech scene, the plot turns to porn. Inside the offices of Pied Piper, the fictional startup at the heart of the show, a shaggy-haired coder hacks into a rival company. The rival, he discovers, has landed a $15 million contract with a porn outfit called Intersite, also fictional, agreeing to build software that will compress Intersite’s videos and send them across the ‘net. Pied Piper’s CEO, Richard Hendricks, is bemused. “I don’t understand,” he says. “How does Intersite have all this money?” “It’s pornography,” says the guy with the highfalutin facial hair. “Adult content has driven more important tech adoption than anything,” says another colleague. “The first fiction ever published on a printing press was an erotic tale. And from there: super 8 film, Polaroid, home video, digital, video on demand—” “—credit card verification systems, Snapchat—” adds a third. “Pornography accounts for 37 percent of all Internet traffic.” “Thirty-eightwhen I’m on it,” says the guy with the highfalutin facial hair. In many ways, the exchange is typical of the show. It’s good for multiple laughs, particularly if you’re wise to the shamelessly