entertainment

Full spoilers ahead: Let’s talk about Marvel’s ‘The Defenders’

To quote Beyonc, "Of course sometimes shit goes down when it's a billion dollars on an elevator." As of this weekend, TV’s answer to The Avengers is officially live: The Defenders hit Netflix with eight episodes, finally fulfilling the promise made by the Marvel deal back in 2013. And the show’s jam-packed with developments we’ve been waiting for. Iron Fist and Luke Cage, together at last! Misty Knight and Colleen Wing, meeting for the very first time! The Hand storyline developed in Daredevil and Iron Fist comes to fruition, and even the literal plot hole of Daredevil Season 2 gets filled up. So why does it all feel so perfunctory? The Defenders is fine. Just fine. It is really cool seeing the whole gang together, though. Image: Netflix To be clear, The Defenders isn’t awful. It’s fine. Just fine! It does what it’s supposed to, which is bring all four heroes together, and those interactions make up the best parts of the show. It’s genuinely thrilling to see Matt introduce himself as Jessica’s lawyer, or Luke and Danny go mano-a-mano in an alleyway. Each main character gets an opportunity to show off their talents and get in some quips. The

Deadpool isn’t looking too lucky in the latest photo from his sequel

Domino, in the comics. Image: Marvel Comics Domino is slaying in the latest photo from Deadpool 2. Literally. Ryan Reynolds has just shared our first look at Zazie Beetz (FX’s Atlanta) in character, and she’s working the hell out of a “red carpet” that happens to be Deadpool himself. SEE ALSO: Ryan Reynolds gives us a peek at ‘Deadpool 2’ Take a look … With great power, comes great irresponsibility. #deadpool #officialsuit @deadpoolmovie pic.twitter.com/MPM89bYz1B Ryan Reynolds (@VancityReynolds) March 27, 2015 As for how Beetz’ Domino compares to her comic book counterpart, it looks like the costume and makeup team have come up with a clever reversal. In the books, she’s a (literally) white person with a black spot over her eye; in the film, she’s a black person with a white spot over her eye. In both versions, she and Deadpool tend to tangle. Feel free to imagine this panel is a prequel to the Deadpool 2 Domino photo. Image: Marvel Comics Domino (and the rest of Deadpool 2) will land in theaters June 1, 2018. WATCH: ‘Deadpool’ as a drama wins all the Oscars Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/07/31/deadpool-2-domino-photo/

Ranking the Marvel Cinematic Universe villains, from Abomination to Zemo

Michael Keaton as Adrian Toomes, a.k.a. the Vulture, in Spider-Man: Homecoming. Image: Columbia Pictures Spoiler alert: This post contains spoilers for all Marvel Cinematic Universe movies, up to and including Spider-Man: Homecoming. A good bad man is hard to find at least within the confines of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. While the franchise has given us some truly memorable superheroes, it’s been significantly less successful at crafting compelling supervillains. Sure, we all love Loki. But do you even remember Yellowjacket? Or Ronan? How about Malekith? Who? Yeah, exactly. SEE ALSO: ‘Homecoming’ is the best ‘Spider-Man’ movie ever made Which is yet another reason Spider-Man: Homecoming feels like such an invigorating change of pace. In the Vulture, the MCU has delivered its best big bad in years and he’s all the more riveting because he’s not your typical scenery-chewing megalomaniac. (It helps, of course, that he’s played by Michael Keaton, who commands the screen and makes it look effortless.) Instead, the Vulture is cut from the same cloth as his webslinging nemesis. Like Spidey, he’s a basically normal dude grappling with the fact that he lives in a superpowered world. Unlike Peter Parker, though, Adrian Toomes isn’t inspired by example to

Against women-only screenings of ‘Wonder Woman’? Its creator would like a word.

If they had cinemas, they'd certainly have women-only screenings. Care to argue with them? Image: warner bros. As the millions of Americans who gave it a record-breaking $100 million weekend now know, Wonder Woman spends most of its opening hour on Themyscira, the fictional island of the Amazons. Or, as it used to be called in the comics, Paradise Island. There’s a reason why William Moulton Marston, Wonder Woman’s creator, gave his heroine the Paradise Island background when he delivered her to the world in 1941. This wasn’t just another Krypton, a way to introduce a superhero with a cool otherworldly origin. SEE ALSO: ‘Wonder Woman’ $100 million box office is the best opening for a female director No, Marston’s reasoning can be summed up by two words that are often mocked in modern political discourse: safe space. His Amazons were women who’d fled slavery in Ancient Greece and found eternal life beyond the terrors of “man’s world.” Their island was an allegory for what real-world women needed Virginia Woolf’s all-important room of one’s own, writ large. Marston, a man ahead of his time in his feminist beliefs, was also a fan of feminist utopias. As Jill Lepore has noted

How Wonder Woman finally made it to the big screen

Wonder Woman's fought her way through (development) hell and back. Image: Clay Enos / Warner Bros. Next week, Wonder Woman hits theaters with her-ever first live-action solo adventure. And it only took her 76 years to get there. Although she’s only a few years younger than her Justice League teammates Superman and Batman, Wonder Woman has had far worse luck making the leap to movies. But it’s not for lack of trying. SEE ALSO: Final ‘Wonder Woman’ trailer: More action, more weapons, and Dr. Poison To the contrary, Wonder Woman is the payoff to decades of on-again, off-again efforts to bring the Amazonian princess to the big screen. With the film just days away from release, let’s take a look back at the long and winding journey it took to get here. Wonder Woman’s early days Wonder Woman first appears in the comics in 1941. Image: DC Comics Wonder Woman made her comic debut in 1941, just two years after Batman and three years after Superman. Even though she was immediately popular, it took her a while to cross over into other media. 1967: Wonder Woman tries to transition to TV. The first attempted Wonder Woman TV series, Who’s Afraid

‘The Gifted’: How will Fox’s new X-Men show tie into the movie universe?

The X-Men took their first tentative steps towards the small screen in February with FX’s Legion which centers around David Haller (Dan Stevens) the secret son of Charles Xavier, who has spent his life believing that his powerful psychic abilities were simply delusions brought on by mental illness. The show’s last two episodes vaguely teased the connection between David and his long-lost father, but despite a few references to mutants, the show felt largely disconnected from the sprawling cinematic universe featuring Professor X, Logan and Magneto. SEE ALSO: ‘Legion’ creator wants the show to prove itself before you call it an X-Men series That won’t be an issue for Fox’s new series The Gifted, which will premiere on the broadcast network on Monday nights this fall. Like Legion, The Gifted is executive produced by the architects of the X-Men cinematic universe, Bryan Singer, Lauren Shuler Donner and Simon Kinberg, along with Marvel TV’s Jeph Loeb and Jim Chory. Oh, and they’re damn sure not afraid of mentioning the X-Men or Magneto’s Brotherhood as the first full-length trailer for the show reveals. “Its very different from [Legion], visually, and yet its very different from the X-Men films as well,” Singer told

A bunch of ‘X-Men’ movies get release dates

Guess who's back? Image: 20th Century fox Here’s hoping you love mutants, because you’ll be seeing a lot of them next year. 20th Century Fox has just announced 2018 release dates for three Marvel movies: the X-Men sequel Dark Phoenix; the X-Men spinoff New Mutants; and the X-Men spinoff sequel Deadpool 2. SEE ALSO: You can probably (maybe?) trust this ‘Avatar’ sequel news, finally Of the three, New Mutants will be the first to arrive on April 13, 2018. Directed by Josh Boone (The Fault in Our Stars), it centers on a team of young superheroes. New Mutants will be followed a month and a half later by Deadpool 2, due out June 1, 2018. That one will be helmed by David Leitch (John Wick, Atomic Blonde) and bring back Ryan Reynolds as the Merc with a Mouth. New additions to the cast will include Josh Brolin as Cable and Zazie Beetz as Domino. And rounding out the franchise’s big year will be Dark Phoenix, scheduled for November 2, 2018. It’ll be an adaptation of the iconic storyline from the Marvel comics, which was previously adapted into X-Men: The Last Stand. Meanwhile, there’s still no word on when the long-in-development

Culture Shock: Everything You Need To Know About Wolverine

Read more: http://www.clickhole.com/article/culture-shock-everything-you-need-know-about-wolve-5816

Death is officially meaningless on TV: Katie Cassidy’s coming back to ‘Arrow’ permanently

Rumors of her death have been greatly exaggerated. Image: Dean Buscher/The CW Well, this is unexpected. Katie Cassidy will be returning to Arrow as a series regular in Season 6 despite the fact that her character, Laurel Lance (aka Black Canary), was killed off in Season 4. In the world of superhero shows, anything is possible and Laurel’s sister, Sara (Caity Lotz) has already proven that you can’t keep a good vigilante down, having died and been resurrected on Arrow before moving over to spinoff series DC’s Legends of Tomorrow. But Cassidy won’t be reviving the Laurel Lance that fans knew and loved for the first four seasons of Arrow she’ll be playing the Earth-2 doppelgnger version of Laurel, aka Black Siren, a metahuman criminal who was brought over to Earth-1 by the villainous speedster known as Zoom in The Flash Season 2. SEE ALSO: Superhero comics creators: we’re political, and always have been After Zoom’s defeat, Arrow villain Prometheus tried to enlist Black Siren in his vendetta against Oliver Queen (Stephen Amell), forcing her to imitate Earth-1 Laurel to try and manipulate him. Black Siren was eventually captured and taken into ARGUS custody, but her story clearly isn’t over

This week’s ‘Walking Dead’ was a bloody mess, but things might be looking up

Image: AMC This recap contains spoilers for The Walking Dead Season 7, episode 13, titled “Bury Me Here.” Welp, that was a lot. This episode opens with some of the residents of the Kingdom loading a single melon onto a truck, an image which is incredibly painful once we learn its meaning. After what seems like a rough night of nightmares, Carol can’t stand her self-imposed solitude any longer. SEE ALSO: Live interview with ‘Walking Dead’ star has hilariously unorthodox ending She heads to the Kingdom to make sure that Daryl was letting the truth in last week’s episode, and everyone back in Alexandria is alright. (Side note: No, he wasn’t and no, they are not.) She confronts Morgan, but it’s clear that she already knows something is wrong. Morgan refuses to tell her what the deal is mostly because he’s Morgan and nothing is easy with him. He does, however, offer to bring her to Alexandria to find out what’s happened, but because she’s Carol, she refuses. She also declines to show Benjamin how to kill walkers and survive outside the walls of the Kingdom. That’s par for the course with Carol this season. As she walks away from