dc-comics

Stop comparing Barry Allen in ‘Justice League’ and ‘The Flash’ – the multiverse has room for both

When Warner Bros. and DC Entertainment made the somewhat controversial choice to keep their superhero movies and TV shows separate — ruling out any crossovers between their big and small screen projects — they were clearly differentiating themselves from Marvel’s interconnected “Cinematic Universe.”  (Never mind that, while ostensibly all taking place in the same continuity, the heroes from Marvel’s TV shows have yet to play any meaningful role, or even merit a namedrop, in Marvel’s movies — that’s a gripe for another day.)  Instead, DC views its properties as a “multiverse,” in which two versions of Superman can coexist peacefully because each story takes place in an alternate dimension: Tyler Hoechlin embodies the Man of Steel on The CW’s Supergirl, while Henry Cavill dons those iconic tights on a parallel earth — a narrative shortcut that comic book publishers have used for years to excuse the conflicting continuities and characterizations of their heroes across their various titles.  We all know the precocious Bruce Wayne played by David Mazouz on Fox’s Gotham definitely won’t grow up into the same Batman portrayed by Ben Affleck, which frees the writers on each project to take creative liberties with their characters without having to

The first ‘Doomsday Clock’ pages introduce a character as controversial as the event itself

Image: DC entertainment It is no exaggeration to say that Doomsday Clock,  officially unveiled at New York Comic-Con, is the most daring thing DC Comics has ever attempted.  This series will attempt to do what many fans think is impossible — completely connect the regular DC Comics Universe (Superman, Batman et al) with that of Alan Moore’s Watchmen, the most celebrated graphic novel of all time.  SEE ALSO: Looks like Damon Lindelof is full steam ahead on that ‘Watchmen’ show for HBO For years, these two worlds have remained completely separate. Then Batman found the iconic button worn by the Comedian in the first issue of DC Rebirth — the book that relaunched the universe.  This move shocked many. The Watchmen (Doctor Manhattan, Ozymandias et al) always existed in their own reality — one in which Richard Nixon was still president in 1985, and half of New York City was destroyed in a successful attempt to avoid nuclear war.  Comics fans may also love Superman, Batman, and Wonder Woman — but separately. Bringing them together with morally grey superheroes from a gritty world of nuclear fears suggests an unworkable clash of storytelling genres.   But Geoff Johns — President and